Those Who Fear Him

Psalm 103:13 (NIV)

As a father has compassion on his children, so the Lord has compassion on those who fear Him;

Our verse today speaks to the love of our Heavenly Father for His children … and so I wanted to go ahead and past it along today as well.  The Psalmist observes how human fathers are compassionate to their children … realizing that they make mistakes … forgiving them when they fall short of expectations … and conveying to them that love is not based upon performance.  Love. Compassion. Grace. Forgiveness.  These are all things that fathers impart to their children.  And so the Psalmist affirms that God deals with us, His children, in a similar manner.  But I would venture to say, though, that it was God who modeled and taught us the true meaning of love and compassion in the first place….  Look at the surrounding text:

Psalm 103:7-14 (NIV)

7 He made known His ways to Moses, His deeds to the people of Israel:
The Lord is compassionate and gracious, slow to anger, abounding in love.
He will not always accuse, nor will He harbor His anger forever;
10 He does not treat us as our sins deserve or repay us according to our iniquities.
11 For as high as the heavens are above the earth, so great is His love for those who fear Him;
12 as far as the east is from the west, so far has He removed our transgressions from us. 13 As a father has compassion on his children, so the Lord has compassion on those who fear Him;
14 for He knows how we are formed; He remembers that we are dust.

Just a quick observation here – note the phrase “those who fear Him.”  The Father’s love is great to those who fear Him.  He has compassion on those who fear Him.  You will find this expression used throughout Scripture.  Often it contrasts how God deals with those who love Him versus those in rebellion and disobedient to Him.  So if you are not “feeling the love” or “feeling the compassion” of God … then check your “fear”.  Examine the sincerity of your reverence for God.  How do you honor Him?  How do you express your love or gratitude to Him? Do you spend time with Him?  Is God in your thoughts throughout the day?  In Verse 10, the Psalmist asserts, “God does not treat us as our sins deserve or repay us according to our iniquities.”  What do you think?  Should He? Does God’s mercy affect how you view Him?  How you worship Him?

Therefore, there is now no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus…. (Cf. Romans 8:1) How does knowing you have been set free from the wrath of God through Christ Jesus impact your reverence for God?  Verse 12 above states, “As far as the east is from the west, so far has He removed our transgressions from us.” It reminds me of another Scripture: “He forgave us all our sins, having canceled the charge of our legal indebtedness, which stood against us and condemned us; He has taken it away, nailing it to the cross.” (Cf. Colossians 2:13-14) Oh, I think we really need to take a deeper look at “those who fear Him”.  We need to stir ourselves up in this present generation and culture to revisit what it means to truly “fear” God … to have reverence for Him … to devote ourselves to His Word … to ask for the Holy Spirit to fill us so that holiness and righteousness come to the forefront of our minds each morning as a new day begins!

To fear God is to have the proper reverence and awe for Him so that we do whatever is required of us in order to serve Him. (Cf. Psalm 89:7; Hebrews 12:28) It means being cognizant of His presence – understanding that His eyes are upon us and His ears are attentive to our prayers. (Cf. Psalm 34:15) It means we are more concerned about what we might do to offend Him rather than how He might respond if we do.  It means we are more concerned with not dishonoring Him; displeasing Him; or disgracing Him through our words or conduct.  In short, it means that our deepest desire is to avoid sin at all cost.  Likewise, it means that we wholly endeavor to love God with all our heart, soul, mind, and strength – and to keep His commandments. (Cf. Deuteronomy 10:12-13) The fear of the Lord is what captures our hearts to take sin seriously enough to die daily.  After all, it was the sin of the world that compelled God to send His Son to be the propitiation for our sins (Cf. 1 John 2:2) Yes, sin in any form is that offensive to God!

In Psalm 130:3-4 (NIV) we read, “If you, Lord, kept a record of sins, Lord, who could stand? But with you there is forgiveness, that you may be feared.”  Is it not the compassion of the Lord that leads us to “fear” Him?  Is it not His kindness that leads us to repentance? (Cf. Romans 2:4) We need to meditate on this Word for us because the blessings of God … His great love … His compassion … are for those who fear Him!  So what is the conclusion? “Now that all has been heard; here is the conclusion of the matter: Fear God and keep His commandments, for this is the duty of all mankind. For God will bring every deed into judgment, including every hidden thing, whether it is good or evil.” (Cf. Ecclesiastes 12:13-14) Yes, at the end of the day, there is no doubt as to what the Father desires of His children.  He wants us to love Him as demonstrated by our reverence and obedience to His commandments.  Jesus said, “If you love me, you will keep my commandments.” (Cf. John 14:15) And John concluded, “For this is the love of God, that we keep His commandments. And His commandments are not burdensome.” (Cf. 1 John 5:3)

I pray that each of us will examine ourselves and think more deeply about all it means to “fear God.”  I have probably only scratched the surface here, so I encourage us to look further into the Word of God for more wisdom, knowledge, and understanding.  Now that I think about it … that does sound ironic because “The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom, and knowledge of the Holy One is understanding.” (Cf. Proverbs 9:10) But maybe that’s right!  Maybe the fear of the Lord actually does begin with His Word….

So Now You Know….

Have a Blessed Day!

Live In His Covenant

Psalm 103:17-18

But from everlasting to everlasting the Lord’s love is with those who fear Him, and His righteousness with their children’s children— with those who keep His covenant and remember to obey His precepts.

This is an awesome passage of Scripture and drives home some key points for us to remember. Let’s break it down and meditate on ways the words can penetrate our hearts and lives:

But from everlasting to everlasting the Lord’s love is with those who fear Him;

What does this say to us?  The love of God is with those who fear Him … who show great reverence for Him.  His love is faithful and everlasting to those who give unto the Lord the glory due His Name! (Cf. 1 Chronicles 16:29; Psalm 29:2; Psalm 96:8) Note how these Scriptures encourage us to GIVE to the Lord … to bring an offering and to worship.  Showing God reverence is not just “lip service” or just the “sacrifice of praise from our lips”; rather, it is the giving of our entire beings and returning a portion of all that He has given us.  As Jesus taught: “Give, and it will be given to you: good measure, pressed down, shaken together, and running over will be put into your bosom. For with the same measure that you use, it will be measured back to you.” ( Cf. Luke 6:38) This precept applies to everything; including our time, our talents, and the treasure He has entrusted us.

and His righteousness with their children’s children

What does this say?  Well, put in the context – from everlasting to everlasting the LORD’s righteousness is with the children and grandchildren of those who fear Him.  What an incredible promise to those who love the LORD and serve Him out of reverence and sincere love….   There is a similar Scripture that some to mind in this regard and addresses the impact of how a person lives upon the generations that come after them.  Consider the second commandment recorded in Exodus 20:

Exodus 20:4-6 (NIV)

“You shall not make for yourself an image in the form of anything in heaven above or on the earth beneath or in the waters below. You shall not bow down to them or worship them; for I, the Lord your God, am a jealous God, punishing the children for the sin of the parents to the third and fourth generation of those who hate me, but showing love to a thousand generations of those who love me and keep my commandments.

Yes, what you and I do … how we live before God … how we demonstrate our reverence for God and His commandments … this “example” impacts the lives of our children and our grandchildren.  Do not take for granted how you live as though it has no impact upon your children and future generations.  It does in every way!  No, our individual walks with God cannot be vicariously imputed to our children, but the influence of ungodliness will impact and influence them and their children in ways we cannot imagine.  All the more reason to seek wisdom for living … to reverence God … to believe in the Lord Jesus Christ … because our children and grandchildren are impacted by our faithfulness or lack thereof….

with those who keep His covenant and remember to obey His precepts.

What does this say?  In context and syntax – from everlasting to everlasting the LORD’s love and righteousness is with those who keep His covenant and remember to obey His precepts.  The keeping of His covenant and obedience to His instruction for righteous living – these draw the love and righteousness of God to us.  And note, God promises that His love and imputed righteousness is eternal for those who love Him … for those who keep His covenant and obey His commands.  This is foundational to what Jesus Himself taught us would be imperative to demonstrating our love for Him:  “If you love Me, keep my commandments.”  (Cf. John 14:15, 21; 15:10)

I pray each of us will take this passage from Psalm 103 to heart and consider how we can have the best impact on the lives of our children and their children … and the generations to come.  We can facilitate blessing or cursing by how we conduct ourselves … by how sincerely we live out our faith before them … because our example can be one of the most powerful influences … for good or for evil … on our offspring and affect how they will live before their children after them….  Let’s endeavor to make our lives a blessing to the next generations for their sake and for the glory of God. Amen.  

So Now You Know…. 

Have a Blessed Day!

Finish The Race!

Acts 20:24

However, I consider my life worth nothing to me; my only aim is to finish the race and complete the task the Lord Jesus has given me—the task of testifying to the good news of God’s grace.

What an interesting personal assessment Paul gives here in this verse: “I consider my life worth nothing to me.”  He goes on to provide some context for his statement – which I think is important for us to include so that the value of his life … our lives … is put into better perspective.  Up to this point in Acts:20, Luke has been documenting the missionary journey undertaken by Paul and the evangelical opportunities for ministry afforded to him along the way.  It has been a fruitful journey, but there have been hardships and challenges in the midst of preaching the Gospel and discipling elders in the churches he labored to establish.  This is the backdrop when we reach Verse 22.

Acts 20:22-24 (NIV) – Paul is speaking

22 “And now, compelled by the Spirit, I am going to Jerusalem, not knowing what will happen to me there. 23 I only know that in every city the Holy Spirit warns me that prison and hardships are facing me. 24 However, I consider my life worth nothing to me; my only aim is to finish the race and complete the task the Lord Jesus has given me—the task of testifying to the good news of God’s grace.”

This is a more useful context to understand what Paul meant regarding the “worth of his life.”  It was not that Paul thought his life had no value; rather, it was a comparison to the calling of preaching the Gospel and completing the “job” which he had been “assigned” to do.  I think this is the more salient point for us to consider.  Each of us has a life given to us by the grace and will of God.  I say will of God because if He did not ordain for you to be conceived, then you would not exist.  Likewise, I say the grace of God because if He had not orchestrated a course around all of the threats and obstacles to your life, you would not continue to be here.  In short, our lives are miracles on many levels of contemplation, and we have been allowed our own free will to navigate it towards meaning and purpose within our mortal limitations.

When we find Christ Jesus … when the testimonies of the Apostles and the Word of God convince our souls of the Truth, a new dimension of life enters our existence.  Our spirits … our beings are born again!  Our concept of “self” is radically altered with the knowledge of God – Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.  We are changed!  The old has gone, the new is here! (Cf. 2 Corinthians 5:17) And so the value or worth we placed on our previous existence is changed as well.  What we thought we valued for our lives becomes replaced with a “purpose” of far more significant value … eternal value.  Our lives, hidden in Christ, have a new motivation … to live worthy of the Lord and to please Him in every way and to be productive in His Kingdom for His glory!

I think when Paul said, “I consider my life worth nothing to me,” I believe he was referring to his former life and the former meaning he had placed on it.  In light of his authentic encounter with the risen Lord Jesus on the road to Damascus, Paul was radically changed and his new life in Christ took on a “life of its own” … a life lived in the context of a close, personal relationship with Jesus and his new assignment to be an ambassador of the Gospel in all its fullness and truth.  In essence, Paul was saying that nothing (prison or hardships) would deter him from completing the good work he was created in Christ Jesus to do, which God had prepared in advance for him to do.” (Cf. Ephesians 2:10) And he expressed this in terms that we can relate in a way to communicate that whatever the risks of following the Lord Jesus and accomplishing His will for my life is more important … of great value … than my own inward, personal aspirations for this experience of life.  It represents a complete surrender to the will of God, and I believe this is an important principle for us to embrace in our journey of faith….

As Pastor Steve shared during his sermon Sunday morning about the life of Joseph (Cf. Genesis 37-47), he observed that Joseph from a youth had a life within the will of God, and yet, Joseph suffered being ridiculed, mocked, abuse, threatened with murder, sold into slavery (human trafficked), lied about, imprisoned, and forsaken, before he finally came to the place of accomplishing what God had purposed in advance for his life.  Surely, all of these horrific hardships and challenges tested his faith in God, yet he remained steadfast in his belief in the ultimate goodness and love of God. The entire time, Joseph was within the will of God, yet his life was far from “perfect” from a human perspective.  Yet Joseph spiritually understood that God was ever present in his life to bring about His will … His good purpose … and with perseverance he awaited it in faith.

Genesis 45:4-8 (NIV) 

Then Joseph said to his brothers, “Come close to me.” When they had done so, he said, “I am your brother Joseph, the one you sold into Egypt! And now, do not be distressed and do not be angry with yourselves for selling me here, because it was to save lives that God sent me ahead of you. For two years now there has been famine in the land, and for the next five years there will be no plowing and reaping. But God sent me ahead of you to preserve for you a remnant on earth and to save your lives by a great deliverance.  8 So then, it was not you who sent me here, but God

Genesis 50:15-21 (NIV)

15 When Joseph’s brothers saw that their father was dead, they said, “What if Joseph holds a grudge against us and pays us back for all the wrongs we did to him?” 16 So they sent word to Joseph, saying, “Your father left these instructions before he died: 17 ‘This is what you are to say to Joseph: I ask you to forgive your brothers the sins and the wrongs they committed in treating you so badly.’ Now please forgive the sins of the servants of the God of your father.” When their message came to him, Joseph wept. 18 His brothers then came and threw themselves down before him. “We are your slaves,” they said. 19 But Joseph said to them, “Don’t be afraid. Am I in the place of God? 20 You intended to harm me, but God intended it for good to accomplish what is now being done, the saving of many lives. 21 So then, don’t be afraid. I will provide for you and your children.” And he reassured them and spoke kindly to them.

As we contemplate the visions and dreams God has instilled in our spirits for our lives … as we seek significance, purpose, and meaning for our lives … let us remember both Joseph and Paul – who despite tremendous opposition and hardship – went on to complete their respective roles in the Kingdom of God.  They did not consider their “own” lives worth anything compared to the rewards of faithfulness to what God called them to do.  And the application of these biblical lessons is for us to persevere in faith to accomplish the work God has given each of us to do in Christ.  As the writer of Hebrews suggested:

Hebrews 12:1-3 (NIV)

1 Therefore, since we are surrounded by such a great cloud of witnesses, let us throw off everything that hinders and the sin that so easily entangles. And let us run with perseverance the race marked out for us, fixing our eyes on Jesus, the author and finisher of our faith, who for the joy that was set before Him endured the cross, despising the shame, and has sat down at the right hand of the throne of God. 3 Consider Him who endured such opposition from sinners, so that you will not grow weary and lose heart.

So I pray that each of us will run the race; reach the finish line; and receive the reward – the crown of life which the Lord has promised to those who love Him. (Cf. James 1:12) I pray we will remain courageous and steadfast in the pursuit of the visions and dreams God has given each of us to guide our journey of faith … and to bear much fruit to the glory of God the Father.  I encourage you to read John 15:1-17.  As Jesus shared with His disciples (and with us), we must remain (abide) in Him in order to bear fruit.  Further, we should understand that the Father will “prune” us in order to bear even more fruit; and that in Christ Jesus we were chosen (appointed) to bear fruit and that it should remain….

So Now You Know….

Have a Blessed Day!

The Ability of Humility

Philippians 2:5-8

In your relationships with one another, have the same mindset as Christ Jesus: Who, being in very nature God, did not consider equality with God something to be used to His own advantage; rather, He made Himself nothing by taking the very nature of a servant, being made in human likeness. And being found in appearance as a man, He humbled Himself by becoming obedient to death— even death on a cross!

I love this passage of Scripture because it gives us a defined expectation for how we are to approach relationships with one another.  Paul clearly indicates that our own personal mindset that should determine the character and quality of our human relationships.  Embedded in his thought process is that we should have the inclination or mental attitude as Christ Jesus.  It is a fixed state of mind … unwavering.  Steadfast.  Resolved. Committed.

So what was the mindset of our Lord?  How did He view His relationships with people … with us?  Paul indicates that Jesus displayed an inconceivable attitude of humility.  “Who being in very nature God, did not consider equality with God something to be used to His own advantage.”  He took on the very nature of a human servant! And He was so obedient to His Master – Father God – that He was willing to die for the purchase of our redemption … even death on a cross.  Wow!  The bar was set extremely high for us! 

Is Paul using hyperbole?  I’m not inclined to believe he is doing so.  I think he is just trying to describe the “mindset” or “attitude” of humility we are to emulate.  Our tendency as humans is compare ourselves with others and then find some point with which to elevate ourselves – mostly in our own eyes but sometimes in the form of diminishing others.  It reminds me of a parable Jesus told:

Luke 18:9-14 (NIV)

To some who were confident of their own righteousness and looked down on everyone else, Jesus told this parable: 10 “Two men went up to the temple to pray, one a Pharisee and the other a tax collector. 11 The Pharisee stood by himself and prayed: ‘God, I thank you that I am not like other people—robbers, evildoers, adulterers—or even like this tax collector. 12 I fast twice a week and give a tenth of all I get.’ 13 “But the tax collector stood at a distance. He would not even look up to heaven, but beat his breast and said, ‘God, have mercy on me, a sinner.’ 14 “I tell you that this man, rather than the other, went home justified before God. For all those who exalt themselves will be humbled, and those who humble themselves will be exalted.”

It is clear that our Lord Jesus desires us to be humble in our attitudes … in our spirits … and in our conduct.  As Paul more fully shared, humility is to govern our relationships within the Church – the Body of Christ:

Romans 12:3-8 (NIV)

For by the grace given me I say to every one of you: Do not think of yourself more highly than you ought, but rather think of yourself with sober judgment, in accordance with the faith God has distributed to each of you.” For just as each of us has one body with many members, and these members do not all have the same function, so in Christ we, though many, form one body, and each member belongs to all the others. We have different gifts, according to the grace given to each of us. If your gift is prophesying, then prophesy in accordance with yourfaith; if it is serving, then serve; if it is teaching, then teach; if it is to encourage, then give encouragement; if it is giving, then give generously; if it is to lead, do it diligently; if it is to show mercy, do it cheerfully.”

The most tangible manifestation of that character is to be willing to love one another to the fullest depth possible – regardless of the personal cost.  And put in context, the giving of ourselves through serving the needs of others within the Body of Christ … as each of us has been uniquely equipped to do … is the application of this passage.  We are not to boast of our gifts … or find pride in them … rather we are to exercise them for the needs of others.  Servanthood.  That was the mind of Christ when He walked this earth.  That is the heart of Christ as He lives in us.  We have been redeemed to participate in the divine nature to operate in our spiritual giftedness for the benefit of others.  Humble servants is what Jesus called us to be for His Kingdom and glory!  

So Now You Know….

Have a Blessed Day!